• Seminary

    Blessings, Wilderness, Testing, and Promised Land (Numbers: part 1 of 3)

    A response to the question: from surveying the book of Numbers, what are some intertextual connections for the Church? Following Israel’s deliverance from slavery in Egypt, God provides Moses with a priestly blessing, offering peace for the journey and a continuation of His divine promises for Israel (Num 6:22-27). For the church this corresponds to our deliverance from sin and salvation through faith in Christ (Rom 6:5-14). However, even after forgiveness, at times we find ourselves in our own wilderness. This is a time of testing and we are instructed not to harden our hearts or be led into rebellion against God (Heb 3.8). As Jesus and the Israelites were tested,…

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    From Oppression to Revelation (Part 3 of 3)

    A response to the question: How do African and Latin perspectives of Exodus influence the church? Latin and African perspectives both proclaim the Exodus story speaks to all people throughout mankind. Each perspective expresses the unifying character of God bringing people out of oppression to liberation. God’s character and divine power recorded in Scripture is the same God that is alive and active working through us in today. Both African and Latin authors identify the significance of calling out leaders within communities to declare Gods message of salvation. Being conscious to forms of oppression and Gods current desire to deliver salvation for all people from present day forms of slavery and…

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    Holy or Wholly Abolished

    Embracing the Law: A Biblical Theological Perspective A précis, by Jesse Brown Tensions arise when discerning consistency in regard to the law between the Old (NT) and New Testaments (NT). However, continuity of the law with all Scripture is rectified when grounded in Gods incremental revelations throughout history, explaining His will for increasing societal bonding applications for the law. The NT reveals that laws interpreted to separate Jews from gentiles were temporary and thus abolished. The law, being the will of God is to be embraced by community through faith, a faith that would identify Gods revelation of Himself in Jesus Christ. The author builds his argument by validating the…

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    Paradigm Shift

    Pentecostal Missions and the Changing Character of Global Christianity  A Review, By Jesse Brown Heather D. Curtis is an associate professor and interim chair of the department of religion at Tufts University. She received her PhD from Harvard University in History of Christianity and American Religion. Some notable publications include Faith in the Great Physician: Suffering and Divine Healing in American Culture (2007) and Depicting Distant Suffering: Evangelicals and the Politics of Pictorial Humanitarianism in the Age of American Empire (2012). Currently, Heather is writing her second book, Holy Humanitarians (in progress) and teaches at Tufts. Success in spreading the Gospel is united with the Holy Spirit, not with presupposed…

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    Leviticus, it’s Different, but so is Our God

    Leviticus is commonly misunderstood and presumed to be of lesser importance to other biblical texts. However, from an anthropologist perspective, Leviticus fits Israelite culture. This perspective fits the mold of a religion concentrated on humility and love for Gods house by bringing people closer to Him, one another, and His whole creation. The author builds his argument on practices the Israelite community followed and contrasts them with other religions existing in corresponding times. Semitic people in ancient times were unique in being monotheistic, not focused on kingship, and removing interceding elements from their religion. Believing in a loving, present and justice seeking God whom makes covenants with His people synchronizes…

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    From Oppression to Revelation (Part 2 of 3)

    Multiple generations of Africans have been abused by colonialism and since have been further oppressed by established systems of political and economic governance that brands much of the population inferior. Teachings brought about by early missionaries were bogged down in religion and an awaiting salvation. However, an active reading of Exodus reveals that God is interested and wanting to intercede for oppressed people today. Reading Exodus should stir up communities to live alternative lives, liberated, seeking and following God. Christians with a living faith reading Exodus will call out for salvation. A reading of Scripture brings together Gods past acts with what He wants to do currently. Revelation will come…

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    Whose Mission is it Anyway

    Missionary Methods: St Paul’s or Ours? A Review, By Jesse Brown Roland Allen was born in Bristol, England and lived from 1868-1947. He graduated from Leeds Clergy Training School and ordained a deacon and priest of the Church of England. Roland took multiple missionary journeys to China. During these trips Roland became a critic of the church revealing the negative impact paternalistic practices in mission were having on native churches. Roland Allen authored many articles and books advocating that churches be self-supporting, self-propagated and self-governing. After much friction between Roland and the Church of England, he became a voluntary priest, continuing missionary journey’s visiting India, Canada, East Africa and Kenya.…